Art 2 Students are now working with Drawing Pencils.

Art 2 Students are now working with Drawing Pencils.

The objectives for this project were to:

  • Create an abstract composition with shapes based on 4 numbers, fill in each shape with a full range of value-black to gray to white.
  • Exhibit a skillful use of the tools: drawing pencils, ruler, kneaded erasers, soft white erasers, and blending sticks to produce a technically correct drawing with no visible outlines. Shape is determined by value.

What is your favorite color?

What is your favorite color?

Studies as early as 1941 indicated that bluish hues were the most preferred; just this summer, the world’s favorite color was declared to be a shade of blue/green based on a 30,000-person survey canvassing 100 countries.[1]  Color preference is not limited to a particular geography or gender.

Blue was determined to be the most popular color for Art 2 students who took an informal color survey on the first day of school. “It is not surprising that our results from my three classes fall in line with the preferences from the rest of the world,” said Art 2 teacher Mrs Schilling.

Researchers contend that a person’s preference for a color is determined by how much a person likes the objects associated with that color.[2]  All of the things associated with blue are mostly positive.

Blue is associated with the sky and water, as well as ballpoint pens and blue jeans, raising the average preference for blue higher than the remainder of the rainbow. Clear sky and clean water are things we all experience universally.

Color preferences can vary depending on the time of year, tied to the changing of the seasons. Typically, the colors of autumn—golden yellows, browns, dark reds—are the least-liked on the color wheel. However surveys conducted in the fall reveal an increased preference for these dark, warm shades, when participants most closely associate them with festive things like hayrides and pumpkin patches.

 

 

[1] Conducted by Hull 2017 UK City of Culture and paper merchant GF Smith, the survey was invited people to select their favorite shade a online by hovering over an infinite palette of shades with their mouse until they landed on the color they found most appealing.

[2] According to research conducted by psychologists Stephen E. Palmer and Karen Schloss at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

 

The Little-Known Reason Pencils Are Yellow by Gabrielle Hick

The Little-Known Reason Pencils Are Yellow by Gabrielle Hick

In 1889 a Czech manufacturing company named Hardtmuth introduced a “luxury pencil” that was painted yellow.Prior to 1889, the highest-quality pencils were left “natural polished.” Manufacturers usually painted their pencils if they were looking to cover up imperfections in the wood. Accordingly, typical paint colors were dark: purple, red, maroon, or black.

“For a long time the best graphite came from England,” explained Duke University professor Henry Petroski, author of The Pencil: A History of Design and Circumstance. The very first graphite deposit was discovered in Borrowdale, England, in 1564, centuries before yellow pencils arrived on the scene. Although the British supply of graphite eventually ran out, soon “a new and superior source was found in Siberia.”

A number of pencil manufacturers, including Hardtmuth, now sourced their graphite from Siberia—the vast Russian province which shares borderland with China. That geographic proximity was key for Hardtmuth as it devised its marketing scheme.

In China, yellow had long been tied to royalty. The legendary ruler considered the progenitor of Chinese civilization was known as the Yellow Emperor; thus, centuries later in Imperial China only the royal family was allowed to wear yellow. Eventually, the shade came to represent happiness, glory, and wisdom. Hardtmuth settled on yellow to communicate the graphite’s geographical origins, while also linking its product to the long-held Chinese associations of royalty, and therefore superiority.

Although Koh-I-Noor Hardtmuth was the first to produce yellow pencils, Faber and Dixon Ticonderoga followed close behind. (The latter is now responsible for the ubiquitous HB 2 pencil required for standardized tests.)

An oft-repeated bit of pencil lore tells of an experiment conducted by Faber in the middle of the 20th century. The company distributed 1,000 pencils—half yellow, half green—to a test group. While both sets of pencils were identical apart from their color, the green pencils were returned en masse with complaints about their shoddy quality.

 

First Thursday Downtown features WHSVisual ARts

First Thursday Downtown features WHSVisual ARts

 

 

The Wakefield High School Visual Arts Department is partnering with the Albion Cultural Exchange to host First Thursday Downtown on June 1 from 6:00-8:00 pm.  This event will be the last art exhibit for the 2016-2017 school year. It is very exciting to host this event that will feature artwork from juniors, sophomores and freshman art students at WHS. The seniors have left the building and now it is time for the underclassmen to showcase their talents. The projects for this upcoming show have been created in the past 6 weeks since Arts Night which was in April.

“Art students are constantly creating and it is very exciting to be able to show off their most recent work,” said Joy Schilling WHSVisual Arts Coordinator. Included in this exhibit will be cardboard sculptures, linoleum prints, paper maché figures and masks, portraits, graphic design work and ceramics.

First Thursday is a great opportunity for the public to see the great things that are happening in the Wakefield Arts Community. Hope to see you on Thursday night.

Children’s Literature Inspired Bookends

Children’s Literature Inspired Bookends

AP Art Show Thursday May 18

AP Art Show Thursday May 18

Over the course of the year,  eleven AP Art students have collectively created 264 works of art. They are excited to exhibit their work for fellow artists at the Albion Cultural Exchange as well as the public during the second annual AP Art Gallery Show on Thursday May 18 from 5:00-8:00pm.

Most pieces are for sale. Come support our student artists and celebrate their accomplishments. We hope you can join us!

What is AP Art?
Advanced Placement, or A.P., Studio Art is a series of courses that are divided into three paths: Drawing, 2-D and 3-D. Each student chooses one path to follow for the school year. Unlike traditional AP exams, the AP Studio Art Exam is a portfolio that encompasses three different portfolios: Quality, Breadth and Concentration.

The Breadth portfolio consists of 12 different pieces of art. These demonstrate the student’s ability to incorporate a multitude of different techniques and subject matters. The Breadth portfolio is meant to show versatility and overall risk-taking and a student voice throughout 12 different, unassociated pieces.

The Concentration portfolio is comprised of 12 different works of art that demonstrate the student’s ability to develop original ideas through a variety of pieces that relate to one central idea. The College Board is looking for growth not only in technique but also in the development of the concept that the student has chosen to focus on.

The Quality portfolio consists of five of the best pieces of work that showcase technical and conceptual skill. These can come from either the Breadth or Concentration portfolios or can be completely new pieces. These works are physically sent to the College Board to be judged by experienced artists and art teachers.

Students will be graded by the College Board on each portfolio individually and by different artists who do not see the other portfolios. These three scores are then averaged together to get one final score which is what the students will receive and higher scores will earn college credit for the students.

Constantine a finalist in the Adobe Premiere “Make the Cut” Contest

Constantine a finalist in the Adobe Premiere “Make the Cut” Contest

Wakefield High Schools TV Production teacher Mr Chris Constantine is a finalist in the Adobe Premiere Pro 25th Anniversary “Make the Cut” Contest and he needs your vote! This is very exciting as it is a global competition. The video is featured in a playlist on the Adobe Creative Cloud YouTube channel. Public voting is from May 1, 2017 through May 5, 2017 by clicking the “thumbs up” button under the video on the YouTube Page. There is a limit of one vote per person/email address per Finalist entry, per day.
Watch his video below. Mr Constantine is Finalist_022:

Copper Tooling Art 2

Copper Tooling Art 2

Students used symbols to communicate ideas.

Throughout time symbols have been used to convey meaning in art. Many artists use symbolism in their art to further tell a story. Art 2 students chose a symbol, learned it’s meaning and created their projects using a  thin sheet of cooper as their canvas.

 

Arts Night was a success!

Arts Night was a success!

The Wakefield Public Schools Visual Arts Department hosted Visual Arts Night from 6:00-8:00 on Tuesday April 11 at the Americal Civic Center.  This display showcased the artwork of Wakefield’s students in grades 1-12 with approximately seventy high school students demonstrating drawing, painting, working on the potter’s wheel, creating computer graphics, and 3-D Printing.